Finger injuries are generally known as a ‘jarred finger.’ It commonly occurs in sports such as netball, AFL, oz tag and rugby. Quite often they are left untreated and can lead to swelling, stiffness, pain and finger deformities. Here we take a look at the most common finger injuries and how a Hand Therapist can help.

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Hand Writing Assessments for Children 

Despite learning in the digital age with laptops and iPads, handwriting is still an essential part of learning. Being able to write legibly allows your child to communicate their knowledge during exams and when they step into the workforce.  

Messy handwriting can be affected by numerous factors. These include:

  • Language deficits
  • Visual, spatial and/or fine motor issues affecting their coordination
  • Environmental factors (eg. sitting posture, size of pencils or pens and desk set up)
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You may be referred to see a ‘hands physio’ or hand therapist after an injury. Do you know what makes a hand therapist different to a general physiotherapist or occupational therapist? Let’s take a look.  

What does a hand therapist do?

A hand therapist, or practitioner in hand therapy, is a qualified occupational therapist or physiotherapist who specialises in treating hand, wrist and upper limb injuries. Hand therapists have further gained their knowledge in the anatomy and rehabilitation of the upper limb by attending courses, clinical experience and self-directed study. 

How can a hand therapist help?

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COVID Safety Notice

First published March 26, 2020 12:40pm. Updated 4th January 8:30am AEST


All patients and visitors must be wearing a mask and sign in upon entry with a QR code.

In Greater Sydney (including Wollongong, Central Coast and Blue Mountains) face masks are mandatory commencing Monday 4 January 2021, with $200 on the spot fines for non-compliance.


COVID-19 Screening Questionnaire

  • Are you feeling unwell with symptoms such as fever, sore throat, cough or shortness of breath?
  • Have you had close contact* with someone who has a confirmed case of coronavirus (COVID-19)? *Face-to-face contact for more than 15 minutes, or have shared an enclosed space for more than two hours.
  • Have you travelled within the last 14 days?

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Training for rowing or exercising on a rowing machine can cause pain in the forearm and wrist.

This can be due to poor technique or repetitive motions straining the forearm and wrist muscles. It can lead to multiple types of overuse injuries such as lateral epicondylitis or intersection syndrome.

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The ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris) tendon can become painful and swollen from a repetitive twisting of the forearm.

The ECU tendon is one of the main muscles to move the wrist, helping it to extend and move to the side in an ulnar direction, but it also plays an important role in stabilising the ulnar side of the wrist during forearm rotation. The tendon lies in a sheath (the 6th dorsal compartment) which holds the tendon stable against the ulnar styloid. It can become inflamed within the sheath during overuse activities that require combined and repetitive wrist extension, ulnar deviation and rotation such as tennis, and golf.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a fairly common condition in the hand that typically presents with nocturnal symptoms of numbness, pins and needles and tingling in the thumb, index, middle and one side of the ring fingers, aggravated by sleeping with a bent wrist.

However, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can also be caused by repetitive, strong and/or sustained gripping during day time activities and then symptoms might be more prevalent during the day than at night.

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A Smith’s fracture is a fracture to the distal radius (wrist). It is often called a reverse Colle’s fracture; the more common type of distal radius fracture.

A Colle’s fracture occurs from falling and landing on an extended wrist (palm side of the hand). The fracture can often displace backwards in the direction of the injury. Whereas a Smith’s fracture is caused by falling with the wrist flexed and the fracture can displace forewards, also in align with the direction of force.

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